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Found 605 results

  1. dnSpy is a tool to reverse engineer .NET assemblies. It includes a decompiler, a debugger and an assembly editor (and more) and can be easily extended by writing your own extension. It uses dnlib to read and write assemblies so it can handle obfuscated assemblies (eg. malware) without crashing. Features Open Source (GPLv3) and Free Forever (:TM:) Assembly Editor Use C# or Visual Basic to edit any method, property and event Code editor has IntelliSense (code completion, signature help, quick info) Whole classes can be added to assemblies by adding C# and Visual Basic code Edit all metadata of types (classes), methods, properties, events, fields Add, remove, rename any type (class), method, property, event, field Edit, add, remove .NET resources and save them to disk The IL editor allows editing method bodies at the IL level: IL instructions, locals, exception handlers Debugger Debug any .NET assembly, no source code required Set breakpoints in any assembly, including framework assemblies, assemblies in the GAC and assemblies existing only in memory Memory window Output window Attach to process Locals window raw contents of locals (eg. decrypted byte arrays) can be saved to disk Call Stack window Threads window Modules window Modules (eg. decrypted in-memory modules) can be saved to disk Exception Settings Can debug dynamic assemblies Debugging CoreCLR assemblies is supported Decompile to C#, Visual Basic, IL Themes: blue, dark, light (and high contrast) Supports smaller screens (eg. laptops) Line height can be optimized for smaller screens Blank and non-alphanumeric lines are 75% the normal height No extra spacing between lines (saves 1 vertical pixel per line) Menu and toolbar share the same line Full screen mode (Shift+Alt+Enter) saves some vertical pixels High DPI support and per-monitor DPI-aware Translated to several languages Highly extensible Write your own extensions and add your own features All major features are already extensions (assembly editor, debugger, decompiler) Multiple tabs and tab groups Your screen is too big? Don’t cut it in half, add another vertical tab group and read two classes at once! The tabs and positions within the text editors are saved when you close dnSpy and restored at startup so you can continue where you left off Search assemblies Search for types (classes), methods, properties, events, fields Search for strings or numbers in code Assembly analyzer Find usages of types (classes), methods, properties, events, fields BAML to XAML decompiler Fast Highlighted references, keywords References under the caret are highlighted to make it easier to see all uses of the reference in the code Tab, Shift+Tab, Ctrl+Shift+Up, Ctrl+Shift+Down moves to the next or previous reference Alt+Down and Alt+Up moves to the next or previous definition (type (class), method, property, event, field) Structure visualizer Vertical guide lines shown between start and end of code blocks Different colors are used for different blocks, eg. loop, conditional, method, etc dnlib is used to read and write assemblies so it can handle obfuscated code (eg. malware) without crashing Go to commands: Entry point Assembly static initialization method (<Module>..cctor) Any metadata token Any metadata row Syntax highlighted tooltips with XML doc comments when hovering over a type (class), method, property, event, field Methods, properties and events are decompiled in source code order or a custom user-defined order Source code order means that related methods are usually next to each other, just like the programmer wanted Background images can be shown in the text editor Export to project decompiles all selected assemblies and creates a Visual Studio solution Multiple assemblies can be exported at the same time Creates a Visual Studio solution (supports VS2005 – VS-latest) and project files Supports WinForms and WPF classes (creates a code-behind .cs/.vb file and a WinForms .resx / WPF .xaml file) Converts .NET resources to .resx files Open from GAC Command line decompiler Supports Windows, Linux and Mac Syntax highlights output to the screen Scripting with C# REPL Call public dnSpy methods from scripts Script the debugger and other extensions Hex editor Method tokens and addresses are shown in comments and can be clicked to go to the raw metadata or IL bytes Metadata editor Collapse Assembly Explorer nodes command to quickly collapse unused nodes And more… Changelog v6.2 RC1 New features: dnSpy now runs under .NET 6 and .NET Framework 4.8. Move to VS2022 icons for UI and exe files (by @InKahootz and @SychicBoy) Support for tilt/horizontal scrolling in the UI. Added support for editing custom attributes on module resources. Added support for modifying the Log2Rid value when saving the module. Add support for ARM64 target architecture in the assembly editor. Add an enum for PE Magic field in the PE editor (by @riQQ) Show debugged process’s name in the title bar (by @InKahootz) Add support for writing VS2022 compatible .sln files. Added back the Save Code, Save BAML, and Save XAML options in the File context menu which save the contents of the currently open document tab. Debugger: Display a warning message before starting to debug a target file with a different bitness than the current dnSpy version running. Add a new option that allows to automatically break on <Module>::.cctor when starting to debug. Display the exception’s HResult property when an unhandled exception is hit. ILSpy decompiler: Added jump to reference support for jmp() expressions created when the jmp CIL opcode is present. CIL disassembler now includes information about generic parameter attributes and constraints. Add more information to the output when disassembling the module node when using the CIL disassembler. The decompiler now splits up long method call chains using a new line. Generate debug info for yield break; statements. Improvements and bug fixes: Fix the .NET 6 console executable having the incorrect subsystem set in the PE options resulting in a crash. Fixed escaping of namespaces in tooltips. Fixed syntax highlighting for structs in tooltips. Improved RVA <-> FileOffset conversions in PE editor to fix a crash with invalid values being passed in. Improved assembly resolution for .NET Standard, .NET Core, .NET 5, .NET 6. Read probe paths from .config files when searching for satellite assemblies during project export. Fixed incorrect label in the Save Module dialog. ILSpy Decompiler Optimized the variable naming step in the decompiler by reducing memory allocations. Improved insertion of checked() blocks. Improved decompilation of query expressions. Prevent delegate construction decompilation from crashing the entire decompiler if it failed. Improved analysis for unsafe modifier. Ignore invalid prefixes when constructing the ILAst. This prevents a common method used to crash the decompiler from working. Many improvements and fixes to the async method decompilation logic. Optimized the removal of dead nop instructions when building the ILAst. This deficiency was a known method to crash dnSpy’s decompiler by filling a method body with huge amounts of useless code. Fixed a rare case where field initializers would not be detected properly. Fixed a rarely occurring bug that resulted in incorrect ILAst being built. Optimized construction of ILAst by calculating the stack behavior of instruction only once and by caching the result of MethodDef.HasReturnType. Improved required parenthesis analysis. Debugger: Fixed a bug that caused the infamous ??? exception to occur when debugging. Improved debugging support for newer mono runtimes. Fixed a crash that occurred in the .NET Framework version of dnSpy when a module loaded into memory during debugging would contain an invalid file path resulting in a crash. BAML decompiler Resolve namespaces of properties. Fix Name attribute for properties incorrect in rare circumstances. Fix missing x:Static and x:Type (by @wwh1004) Dependency updates: Updated dnlib to 3.5.0 Updated Iced to 1.17.0 Roslyn compiler to 4.1.0 Ookii.Dialogs.Wpf to 5.0.1 VS MEF to 16.9.20 ILSpy to 2.4 Mono.Debugger.Soft was updated to the latest commit. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  2. About BirDuster is a Python based knockoff of the original DirBuster. BirDuster is a multi threaded Python application designed to brute force directories and files names on web/application servers. Often is the case now of what looks like a web server in a state of default installation is actually not, and has pages and applications hidden within. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  3. HaE is used to highlight HTTP requests and extract information from HTTP response messages or request messages. The plugin can custom regular expressions to match HTTP response messages. You can decide for yourself whether the corresponding request that meets the custom regular expression match needs to be highlighted and information extracted. Note: The use of HaE requires a basic regular expression foundation for testers. Since the Java regular expression library is not as elegant or convenient as Python when using regular expressions, HaE requires users to use () to extract what they need The expression content contains; for example, if you want to match a response message of a Shiro application, the normal matching rule is rememberMe=delete, if you want to extract this content, you need to become (rememberMe=delete). [hide][Hidden Content]]
  4. XLM Macro Deobfuscator XLM Macro Deobfuscator can be used to decode obfuscated XLM macros (also known as Excel 4.0 macros). It utilizes an internal XLM emulator to interpret the macros, without fully performing the code. It supports both xls, xlsm, and xlsb formats. It uses xlrd2, pyxlsb2, and its own parser to extract cells and other information from xls, xlsb, and xlsm files, respectively. You can also find XLM grammar in xlm-macro-en.lark Changelog v0.2.6 Fix bug in interpreting a formula if contains a sheet name that is a valid col name like C1 [hide][Hidden Content]]
  5. Automatic Reconnaissance and Scanning in Penetration Testing. What is Osmedeus? Osmedeus allows you automated run the collection of awesome tools to reconnaissance and vulnerability scanning against the target. Feature Subdomain Scan. Subdomain TakeOver Scan. Screenshot the target. Basic recon like Whois, Dig info. Web Technology detection. IP Discovery. CORS Scan. SSL Scan. Wayback Machine Discovery. URL Discovery. Headers Scan. Port Scan. Vulnerable Scan. Seperate workspaces to store all scan output and details logging. REST API. React Web UI. Support Continuous Scan. Slack notifications. Easily view the report from the command line. Changelog v4.1.1 Added a new clean-up script for public ffuf to show more beautiful output. Added a new workflow for testing notifications. Added a detailed notification setup page at docs.osmedeus.org/installation/notification/. Added a new tool str-replace to generate even more permutation subdomains (see probing module). [hide][Hidden Content]]
  6. dEEpEst

    Execution logging and tracing

    Execution logging and tracing • Wireshark - A free and open-source packet analyzer • tcpdump - A powerful command-line packet analyzer; and libpcap, a portable C/C++ library for network traffic capture • mitmproxy - An interactive, SSL-capable man-in-the-middle proxy for HTTP with a console interface • Charles Proxy - A cross-platform GUI web debugging proxy to view intercepted HTTP and HTTPS/SSL live traffic • usbmon - USB capture for Linux. • USBPcap - USB capture for Windows. • dynStruct - structures recovery via dynamic instrumentation. • drltrace - shared library calls tracing.
  7. HaE is used to highlight HTTP requests and extract information from HTTP response messages or request messages. The plugin can custom regular expressions to match HTTP response messages. You can decide for yourself whether the corresponding request that meets the custom regular expression match needs to be highlighted and information extracted. Note: The use of HaE requires a basic regular expression foundation for testers. Since the Java regular expression library is not as elegant or convenient as Python when using regular expressions, HaE requires users to use () to extract what they need The expression content contains; for example, if you want to match a response message of a Shiro application, the normal matching rule is rememberMe=delete, if you want to extract this content, you need to become (rememberMe=delete). [hide][Hidden Content]]
  8. Sqlmap is an open-source penetration testing tool that automates the process of detecting and exploiting SQL injection flaws and taking over database servers. It comes with a powerful detection engine, many niche features for the ultimate penetration tester, and a broad range of switches lasting from database fingerprinting, over data fetching from the database to accessing the underlying file system and executing commands on the operating system via out-of-band connections. Changelog v1.6.5 One patch related to #5087 [hide][Hidden Content]]
  9. A cross-platform Java application for decoding, monitoring, recording, and streaming trunked mobile and related radio protocols using Software Defined Radios (SDR). SDRtrunk is an integrated application for demodulating radio signals and decoding trunked radio network protocols and some related radio signal formats. The application does NOT require a discriminator tapped scanner and it does NOT require the use of audio piping applications like Virtual Audio Cable. All connections between the tuner or sound card and the decoders are provided by the sdrtrunk application. SDRTrunk uses channel definitions to configure and set up each demodulation and decoder processing sequence. In order to successfully decode radio signals, each channel configuration requires: Source – specifies where to get the radio samples from (tuner or sound card) Decoder – which demodulator or decoder to use in processing the source samples Each channel definition allows you to optionally configure: Aux Decoder – additional in-band audio digital signal protocol decoding Logging – log decoded messages or events Recording – record audio calls or digitized baseband samples The SDRTrunk application is programmed in Java and can run on any computer where Java is supported for the operating system and where the computer hardware (processor/memory) is sufficient for the processing workload. Changelog v0.5.0 beta3 1. Features: USB Tuner Management Redesign Enable/Disable Tuners on Startup Tuner Tab & Tuner Editors Redesign Embedded Java 18 2. Requirements: Windows x86 (64-bit) Linux x86/aarch64 (64-bit) OSX x86/aarch64 (64-bit) Note: JMBE library must be manually downloaded/built for OSX aarch64 due to OSX sandboxing of downloaded code. Note: Linux for arm-32 is NOT currently supported 3. Optional Requirements JMBE version 1.0.9+ is required for decoding APCO25 Phase 1/2 and DMR digital audio on Linux and OSX aarch64. Starting with Version 0.5.0 Alpha 2, you no longer have to install Java and compile the JMBE library. sdrtrunk now has integrated support for creating the JMBE library. Legacy instructions for compiling the JMBE library are located at: [Hidden Content] 4. User Manual Playlist Editor User Manual Version 0.5.0 User Manual Version 0.3.0 and 0.4.0 5. Support Please post user support questions or report issues/errors to: Discord: [Hidden Content] Google Groups: [Hidden Content] 6. Enhancements/Fixes #1098 #1177 Message Filtering @VolFFProCoder #1186 Error on channel shutdown #PR Headless Operation @ImagoTrigger #1190 Tuner Management Redesign #1194 Streaming MP3 Bit Rate Scheduling #1209 Tuner Deref #1210 Tuner Instance Memory Leak #1212 Icecast Inline Metadata Streaming @doug-hoffman #1213 Normalize Audio On Recording @doug-hoffman #1214 #1218 Broadcastify Calls Periodic Checkin (optional) @doug-hoffman #1219 Tuner Error On Restart #1221 Tuner NPE On Restart #1223 NPE on Airspy/HackRF Restart [hide][Hidden Content]]
  10. efiXplorer – IDA plugin for UEFI firmware analysis and reverse engineering automation Supported versions of Hex-Rays products: every time we focus on the last versions of IDA and Decompiler because trying to use the most recent features from new SDK releases. That means we tested only on recent versions of Hex-Rays products and do not guarantee stable work on previous generations. Why not IDApython: all code developed in C++ because it’s a more stable and performant way to support a complex plugin and get the full power of the most recent SDK’s features. Supported Platforms: Win, Linux, and OSX (x86/x64). Changelog v4.1 [new feature] Improved SMI handlers recognition to support: SxSmiHandler, IoTrapSmiHandler, UsbSmiHandler and etc. [new feature] Improved child SW SMI handlers recognition and now annotated as ChildSwSmiHandler. [new feature] Added visual representation for NVRAM variables and additional context in JSON report: address, service name, var name and var GUID. [bug fix] Numerous improvements and bug fixes in code analyzer and firmware image loader Moving to support of IDA SDK v7.7 [hide][Hidden Content]]
  11. IPBan Service Windows For Windows, IPBan is supported on Windows Server 2008 or equivalent or newer. Windows XP and Server 2003 are NOT supported. Extract the IPBan.zip (inside is IPBanWindows.zip) file to a place on your computer. Right-click on all the extracted files and select properties. Make sure to select “unblock” if the option is available. You MUST make this change to the local security policy to ensure IP addresses show up: Change Local Security Policy -> Local Policies -> Audit Policy and turn failure logging on for “audit account logon events” and “audit logon events”. From an admin command prompt: auditpol /set /category:”Logon/Logoff” /success:enable /failure:enable For Windows Server 2008 or equivalent, you should disable NTLM logins and only allow NTLM2 logins. On Windows Server 2008, there is no way to get the ip address of NTLM logins. Use secpol -> local policies -> security options -> network security restrict NTLM incoming NTLM traffic -> deny all accounts. To run as a Windows service run “sc create IPBAN type= own start= auto binPath= c:\path\to\service\IPBan.exe DisplayName= IPBAN”. The service needs a file system, event viewer, and firewall access, so please run as SYSTEM to ensure permissions. To run as a console app, simply run IPBan.exe and watch console output. If you want to run and debug code in Visual Studio, make sure to run Visual Studio as administrator. Visual Studio 2017 or newer is required, along with .net core 2.1.1. The community edition is free. Linux IPBan is currently supported on Ubuntu 16.X – 18.X. For other Linux or MAC, you may need to adjust some of the instructions and add config file entries for the appropriate log files to parse. SSH into your server as root. If using another admin account name, substitute all root user instances with your account name. Changelog v1.7.2 Fix an issue not unbanning ipv6 properly in Windows Firewall [hide][Hidden Content]]
  12. HaE is used to highlight HTTP requests and extract information from HTTP response messages or request messages. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  13. Description Hello, Welcome to my “Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing with Free Tools” course. Learn hackers`Web Hacking, Network Scanning and Password Cracking tools such as Wireshark, Nmap, Metasploit, Maltego My name is Muharrem Aydin ( white-hat Hacker ), creator of the three best-selling Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing courses on Udemy. Whether you want to get your first job in IT security, become a white hat hacker, or prepare to check the security of your own home network, Oak Academy offers practical and accessible ethical hacking courses to help keep your networks safe from cybercriminals. Penetration testing skills make you a more marketable IT tech. Understanding how to exploit servers, networks, and applications means that you will also be able to better prevent malicious exploitation. From website and network hacking, to pen testing in Python and Metasploit, Oak Academy has a course for you. Ethical Hacking is in demand. Learn Ethical Hacking penetration testing, web hacking, Metasploit & become an ethical hacker. Whether you want to get your first job in IT security, become a white hat hacker, or prepare to check the security of your own home network, Oak Academy offers practical and accessible ethical hacking courses to help keep your networks safe from cybercriminals. This time I’ve designed my “Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing with Free Tools” course, for YOU! This course is for everyone! If you don’t have any previous experience, not a problem! This course is expertly designed to teach everyone from complete beginners, right through to pro hackers. You’ll go from beginner to extremely high-level and I will take you through each step with hands-on examples. In this course, I have listed the web’s favorite ethical hacking / pentesting hacker tools as used by hackers, geeks, ethical hackers and security engineers (as well as black hat hackers). ★★★★★ All tools are free. So you don’t need to buy any tool or application. ★★★★★ You will learn the theory, background and trendy free tools used to leverage the most updated attacks in the hacking world with real-world examples and demos. In this course, you will first learn how to set up a lab ( Kali Linux ) and install needed software on your machine. Then you will learn; Network Scan Tools Wireshark, Hping, Nmap, Zenmap Vulnerability Scan Tool Nessus Exploitation Tool Metasploit Framework Password Cracking Tools Hydra, Cain and Abel, John The Ribber Information Gathering Over the Internet Tools SearchDiggity, Shodan, Maltego, Web Hacking Tools Burp Suite, ZAP, Beef, SQLMap Social Engineering and Phishing Tools Veil, Fatrat, Empire Project & Network Layer & Layer-2 Attacks Tools Yersinia for DHCP Starvation Here is the list of what you’ll learn by the end of course, Setting Up The Laboratory Set Up Kali Linux from VM Image Set Up Kali Linux from ISO File Set Up a Victim: Metasploitable Linux Set Up a Victim: OWASP Broken Web Applications Set Up a Victim: Windows System Network Scan Tools Wireshark: Sniffing the Network Traffic Wireshark: Following a Stream Wireshark: Summarise the Network TCPDump in Action Hping for Active Scan and DDoS Attacks Network Scan Tools – NMAP Ping Scan to Enumerate Network Hosts Introduction to Port Scan SYN Scan Port Scan Details TCP Scan UDP Scan Version Detection Operating System Detection Input & Output Management in Nmap Introduction to Nmap Scripting Engine (NSE) Nmap Scripting Engine: First Example Nmap Scripting Engine: Second Example Some Other Types of Scans: XMAS, ACK, etc. Idle (Stealth) Scan Vulnerability Scan Tool: Nessus Nessus: Introduction Download & Install Nessus Creating a Custom Policy Scanning Reporting Exploitation Tool: Metasploit Framework (MSF) MSF Console: Search Function & Ranking of the Exploits MSF Console: Configure & Run an Exploit Meeting with Meterpreter Meterpreter Basics on Linux Meterpreter Basics on Windows Meterpreter for Post-Exploitation Incognito Extension of Meterpreter Mimikatz in Meterpreter Post Modules of Metasploit Framework (MSF) Managing Post Modules of MSF Password Cracking Tools Hydra: Cracking the Password of a Web App Hydra: Online SSH Password Cracking Cain and Abel: Install & Run Cain and Abel: Gathering Hashes Cain & Abel: A Dictionary Attack Cain & Abel: A Brute Force Attack John the Ripper Information Gathering Over the Internet Tools SearchDiggity: A Search Engine Tool Information Gathering Over the Internet Tools SearchDiggity: A Search Engine Tool Shodan FOCA: Fingerprinting Organisations with Collected Archives The Harvester & Recon-NG Maltego – Visual Link Analysis Tool Web App Hacking Tools Burp Suite: Intercepting the HTTP Traffic Burp Suite: Intercepting the HTTPS Traffic Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP): A Web App Vulnerability Scanner ZAP: Installation & Quick Scan ZAP: As a Personal Proxy ZAP: Intercepting the HTTPS Traffic ZAP: An Advanced Scan – Scanning a Website that Requires to Login SQLMap: Leveraging an SQL Injection Exploit Social Engineering and Phishing Tools Veil: Introduction Veil: In Action FatRat: Introduction FatRat: In Action Empire Project: Installation Empire in Action Social Engineering Toolkit (SET) for Phishing Network Layer & Layer-2 Attacks Tools GNS3: Let’s Create Our Network – Download & Install GNS3: Setting Up the First Project GNS3: Tool Components GNS3: Building the Network GNS3: Attaching VMware VMs (Including Kali) to the Network GNS3: Configuring Switch & Router (Cisco) and creating VLANs Macof for MAC Flood Ettercap for ARP Cache Poisoning What is Ethical Hacking and what is it used for ? Ethical hacking involves a hacker agreeing with an organization or individual who authorizes the hacker to levy cyber attacks on a system or network to expose potential vulnerabilities. An ethical hacker is also sometimes referred to as a white hat hacker. Many depend on ethical hackers to identify weaknesses in their networks, endpoints, devices, or applications. The hacker informs their client as to when they will be attacking the system, as well as the scope of the attack. An ethical hacker operates within the confines of their agreement with their client. They cannot work to discover vulnerabilities and then demand payment to fix them. This is what gray hat hackers do. Ethical hackers are also different from black hat hackers, who hack to harm others or benefit themselves without permission. Is Ethical Hacking a good career? Yes, ethical hacking is a good career because it is one of the best ways to test a network. An ethical hacker tries to locate vulnerabilities in the network by testing different hacking techniques on them. In many situations, a network seems impenetrable only because it hasn’t succumbed to an attack in years. However, this could be because black hat hackers are using the wrong kinds of methods. An ethical hacker can show a company how they may be vulnerable by levying a new type of attack that no one has ever tried before. When they successfully penetrate the system, the organization can then set up defenses to protect against this kind of penetration. This unique security opportunity makes the skills of an ethical hacker desirable for organizations that want to ensure their systems are well-defended against cybercriminals. What skills do Ethical Hackers need to know? In addition to proficiency in basic computer skills and use of the command line, ethical hackers must also develop technical skills related to programming, database management systems (DBMS), use of the Linux operating system (OS), cryptography, creation and management of web applications and computer networks like DHCP, NAT, and Subnetting. Becoming an ethical hacker involves learning at least one programming language and having a working knowledge of other common languages like Python, SQL, C++, and C. Ethical hackers must have strong problem-solving skills and the ability to think critically to come up with and test new solutions for securing systems. Ethical hackers should also understand how to use reverse engineering to uncover specifications and check a system for vulnerabilities by analyzing its code. Why do hackers use Linux? Many hackers use the Linux operating system (OS) because Linux is a free and open-source OS, meaning that anyone can modify it. It’s easy to access and customize all parts of Linux, which allows a hacker more control over manipulating the OS. Linux also features a well-integrated command-line interface, giving users a more precise level of control than many other systems offer. While Linux is considered more secure than many other systems, some hackers can modify existing Linux security distributions to use them as hacking software. Most ethical hackers prefer Linux because it’s considered more secure than other operating systems and does not generally require the use of third-party antivirus software. Ethical hackers must be well-versed in Linux to identify loopholes and combat malicious hackers, as it’s one of the most popular systems for web servers. Is Ethical Hacking Legal? Yes, ethical hacking is legal because the hacker has full, expressed permission to test the vulnerabilities of a system. An ethical hacker operates within constraints stipulated by the person or organization for which they work, and this agreement makes for a legal arrangement. An ethical hacker is like someone who handles quality control for a car manufacturer. They may have to try to break certain components of the vehicle such as the windshield, suspension system, transmission, or engine to see where they are weak or how they can improve them. With ethical hacking, the hacker is trying to “break” the system to ascertain how it can be less vulnerable to cyberattacks. However, if an ethical hacker attacks an area of a network or computer without getting expressed permission from the owner, they could be considered a gray hat hacker, violating ethical hacking principles. What is the Certified Ethical Hacker ( CEH ) Certification Exam? The Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification exam supports and tests the knowledge of auditors, security officers, site administrators, security professionals, and anyone else who wants to ensure a network is safe against cybercriminals. With the CEH credential, you can design and govern the minimum standards necessary for credentialing information that security professionals need to engage in ethical hacking. You can also make it known to the public if someone who has earned their CEH credentials has met or exceeded the minimum standards. You are also empowered to reinforce the usefulness and self-regulated nature of ethical hacking. The CEH exam doesn’t cater to specific security hardware or software vendors, such as Fortinet, Avira, Kaspersky, Cisco, or others, making it a vendor-neutral program. What is the Certified Information Security Manager ( CISM ) exam? Passing the Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) exam indicates that the credentialed individual is an expert in the governance of information security, developing security programs and managing them, as well as managing incidents and risk. For someone to be considered “certified,” they must have passed the exam within the last five years, as well as work full-time in a related career, such as information security and IT administration. The exam tests individuals’ knowledge regarding the risks facing different systems, how to develop programs to assess and mitigate these risks, and how to ensure an organization’s information systems conform to internal and regulatory policies. The exam also assesses how a person can use tools to help an organization recover from a successful attack. What are the different types of hackers? The different types of hackers include white hat hackers who are ethical hackers and are authorized to hack systems, black hat hackers who are cybercriminals, and grey hat hackers, who fall in-between and may not damage your system but hack for personal gain. There are also red hat hackers who attack black hat hackers directly. Some call new hackers green hat hackers. These people aspire to be full-blown, respected hackers. State-sponsored hackers work for countries and hacktivists and use hacking to support or promote a philosophy. Sometimes a hacker can act as a whistleblower, hacking their own organization in order to expose hidden practices. There are also script kiddies and blue hat hackers. A script kiddie tries to impress their friends by launching scripts and download tools to take down websites and networks. When a script kiddie gets angry at… FAQ regarding Penetration Testing : What is penetration testing? Penetration testing, or pen testing, is the process of attacking an enterprise’s network to find any vulnerabilities that could be present to be patched. Ethical hackers and security experts carry out these tests to find any weak spots in a system’s security before hackers with malicious intent find them and exploit them. Someone who has no previous knowledge of the system’s security usually performs these tests, making it easier to find vulnerabilities that the development team may have overlooked. You can perform penetration testing using manual or automated technologies to compromise servers, web applications, wireless networks, network devices, mobile devices, and other exposure points. What are the different types of penetration testing? There are many types of penetration testing. Internal penetration testing tests an enterprise’s internal network. This test can determine how much damage can be caused by an employee. An external penetration test targets a company’s externally facing technology like their website or their network. Companies use these tests to determine how an anonymous hacker can attack a system. In a covert penetration test, also known as a double-blind penetration test, few people in the company will know that a pen test is occurring, including any security professional. This type of test will test not only systems but a company’s response to an active attack. With a closed-box penetration test, a hacker may know nothing about the enterprise under attack other than its name. In an open-box test, the hacker will receive some information about a company’s security to aid them in the attack. What are the different stages of penetration testing? Penetration tests have five different stages. The first stage defines the goals and scope of the test and the testing methods that will be used. Security experts will also gather intelligence on the company’s system to better understand the target. The second stage of a pen test is scanning the target application or network to determine how they will respond to an attack. You can do this through a static analysis of application code and dynamic scans of running applications and networks. The third stage is the attack phase, when possible vulnerabilities discovered in the last stage are attacked with various hacking methods. In the fourth stage of a penetration test, the tester attempts to maintain access to the system to steal any sensitive data or damaging systems. The fifth and final stage of a pen test is the reporting phase, when testers compile the test results. You’ll also get: Lifetime Access to The Course Fast & Friendly Support in the Q&A section Udemy Certificate of Completion Ready for Download Enroll now to become professional Free Tools for Penetration Testing and Ethical Hacking! IMPORTANT: This course is created for educational purposes and all the information learned should be used when the attacker is authorized. Who this course is for: People who want to start from scratch and to move more advanced level Leaders of incident handling teams People who want to take their Hacking skills to the next level People who are cyber security experts People who want transition to Cyber Security Incident handlers System administrators who are on the front lines defending their systems and responding to attacks Other security personnel who are first responders when systems come under attack People who are willing to make a career in Cyber Security Anyone who want to do a Penetration Testing against Wi-Fi networks. Anyone who wants to be a White Hat Hacker in ethical hacking and penetration testing course Those who want to start from scratch and move forward in web hacking Anyone who wants to learn ethical hacking Requirements 8 GB (Gigabytes) of RAM or higher (16 GB recommended) for ethical hacking and penetration testing 64-bit system processor is mandatory for ethical hacking course 20 GB or more disk space for ethical hacking and penetration testing course Enable virtualization technology on BIOS settings, such as “Intel-VTx” Modern Browsers like Google Chrome (latest), Mozilla Firefox (latest), Microsoft Edge (latest) All items referenced in this course are Free A computer for installing all the free software and tools needed to practice A strong desire to understand hacker tools and techniques in ethical hacking Be able to download and install all the free software and tools needed to practice in hacking A strong work ethic, willingness to learn and plenty of excitement about the back door of the digital world Nothing else! It’s just you, your computer and your ambition to get started today in penetration testing [Hidden Content] [hide][Hidden Content]]
  14. Ethical Hacking with KALI LINUX What you’ll learn Penetration Testing with KALI and More: All You Need to Know Course Learn simplified ethical hacking techniques from scratch Linux basics Learn more than 9 ways to perform LAN attacks Master 2 smart techniques to crack into wireless networks Perform an actual Mobile attack Learn 10+ web application attacks Learn more than 5 proven methods of Social Engineering attacks Obtain 20+ skills any penetration tester needs to succeed Make better decisions on how to protect your applications and network Upgrade your information security skills for a new job or career change Learn how to write a professional penetration testing report Requirements Intermediate computer knowledge Fair knowledge of Windows systems Networking basics Programming basics Web applications basics Mobile applications basics General idea about information security Description Welcome to this comprehensive course on penetration testing with KALI. The course examines the various penetration testing concepts and techniques employed in a modern ubiquitous computing world and will take you from a beginner to a more advanced level. We will discuss various topics ranging from traditional to many modern ones, such as Networking security, Linux security, Web Applications structure and security, Mobile Applications architecture and security, Hardware security, and the hot topic of IoT security. At the end of the course, I will show you some real attacks. The layout of the course is easy to walk-through, and the videos are made short and engaging. My purpose is to present you with case exposition and show you live demos while utilizing a large set of KALI tools (Enumeration, Scanning, Exploitation, Persistence Access, Reporting, and Social Engineering tools) in order to get you started quickly. The necessary resources and tools are posted for each section of the course. Before jumping into penetration testing, you will first learn how to set up your own lab and install the needed software to practice Penetration Testing along with me. All the attacks explained in this course are launched against real devices, and nothing is theoretical. The course will demonstrate how to fully control victims’ devices such as servers, workstations, and mobile phones. The course can also be interesting to those looking for quick hacks such as controlling victim’s camera, screen, mobile contacts, emails, and SMS messages. At the end of the course, you will be equipped with the necessary tools and skills to: 1) Assess security risks by adopting a standard Threat Modeling technique 2) Adopt a structured approach to perform Penetration Tests 3) Protect yourself and the organization you work at 4) Compile security findings and present them professionally to your clients 5) Make the world a safer place You can as well enjoy the JUICY BONUS section at the end of the course, which shows you how to set up useful portable Pentest Hardware Tools that you can employ in your attacks. I will be happy to answer all your inquiries and connect with you. Join TODAY and enjoy life-time access. PS: The course is available in Arabic as well as Russian versions. Hack Ethically! Who this course is for: Anyone who wants to learn how to secure their systems from hacker Who wants to learn how hackers can attack their computer systems Anyone looking to become a penetration tester (From zero to hero) Computer Science, Computer Security, and Computer Engineering Students Content From: [Hidden Content] Ethical password hacking and protecting Course [Hidden Content] [hide][Hidden Content]]
  15. HaE is used to highlight HTTP requests and extract information from HTTP response messages or request messages. The plugin can custom regular expressions to match HTTP response messages. You can decide for yourself whether the corresponding request that meets the custom regular expression match needs to be highlighted and information extracted. Note: The use of HaE requires a basic regular expression foundation for testers. Since the Java regular expression library is not as elegant or convenient as Python when using regular expressions, HaE requires users to use () to extract what they need The expression content contains; for example, if you want to match a response message of a Shiro application, the normal matching rule is rememberMe=delete, if you want to extract this content, you need to become (rememberMe=delete). [hide][Hidden Content]]
  16. Aka my wip gui for android reverse engineers and crackers. Built on top of pyqt5 (compatible with all os’s), Frida and some terrible code. Features Quick spawn, inject and sleep at application onCreate Hook natives, java and loading modules cycle before initializations Hooks conditions and js script logic Manipulate memory and arguments Memory and disasm view (Powered by capstone) Switch between hooks on different threads Inputs are evaluated. Frida js api and dwarf shortcuts are usable in almost any input field Variables creation Save and load back hooks and variables [Hidden Content]
  17. APKiD gives you information about how an APK was made. It identifies many compilers, packers, obfuscators, and other weird stuff. It’s PEiD for Android. Changelog v2.1.3 Add or improve detections for: AliPay ApkEncryptor APKProtect AppGuard CrackProof DexGuard DexProtector Hikari JsonPacker Ollvm Promon Shield Tencent Legu [hide][Hidden Content]]
  18. Sqlmap is an open-source penetration testing tool that automates the process of detecting and exploiting SQL injection flaws and taking over database servers. It comes with a powerful detection engine, many niche features for the ultimate penetration tester, and a broad range of switches lasting from database fingerprinting, over data fetching from the database to accessing the underlying file system and executing commands on the operating system via out-of-band connections. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  19. Description *Get the Official Certificate after Completing the Course Learn Malware Analysis and Reverse Engineering Deeply with CRMA+ 2022 Course. Breaking something down and putting it back together is a process that helps people understand how things were made. A person would be able to redo and reproduce an origami by unfolding it first. Knowing how cars work requires understanding each major and minor mechanical part and their purposes. The complex nature of the human anatomy requires people to understand each and every part of the body. How? By dissecting it. Reverse engineering is a way for us to understand how things were designed, why is it in its state, when it triggers, how it works, and what its purpose is. In effect, the information is used to redesign and improve for better performance and cost. It can even help fix defects. It is amazing, and rather disconcerting, to realize how much software we run without knowing for sure what it does. We buy software off the shelf in shrink wrapped packages. We run setup utilities that install numerous files, change system settings, delete or disable older versions and superseded utilities, and modify critical registry files. Every time we access a Website, we may invoke or interact with dozens of programs and code segments that are necessary to give us the intended look, feel, and behaviour. We purchase CDs with hundreds of games and utilities or download them as shareware. We exchange useful programs with colleagues and friends when we have tried only a fraction of each program’s features. Then, we download updates and install patches, trusting that the vendors are sure that the changes are correct and complete. We blindly hope that the latest change to each program keeps it compatible with all of the rest of the programs on our system. We rely on much software that we do not understand and do not know very well at all. I refer to a lot more than our desktop or laptop personal computers. The concept of ubiquitous computing, or “software everywhere,” is rapidly putting software control and interconnection in devices throughout our environment. The average automobile now has more lines of software code in its engine controls than were required to land the Apollo astronauts on the Moon. Malware analysis is the study of malware’s behaviour. The objective of malware analysis is to understand the working of malware and how to detect and eliminate it. It involves analysing the suspect binary in a safe environment to identify its characteristics and functionalities so that better defences can be built to protect an organization’s network. Imagine if the Trojan Horse was thoroughly inspected and torn down before it was allowed to enter the gates of a city. This would probably cause a few dead soldiers outside the gate fighting for the city. The next time the city is sent another Trojan Horse, archers would know where to point their arrows. And no dead soldiers this time. The same is true for malware analysis—by knowing the behaviours of a certain malware through reverse engineering, the analyst can recommend various safeguards for the network. Think of it as the Trojan Horse being the malware, the analyst being the soldier who initially inspected the horse, and the city being the network of computers. Who this course is for: Beginner Reverse Engineers who curious about learning Reverse Engineering Beginner Malware Analyst who curious about learning Malware Analysis Requirements Basic Computer Understanding [Hidden Content] [Hidden Content]
  20. HaE is used to highlight HTTP requests and extract information from HTTP response messages or request messages. The plugin can custom regular expressions to match HTTP response messages. You can decide for yourself whether the corresponding request that meets the custom regular expression match needs to be highlighted and information extracted. Note: The use of HaE requires a basic regular expression foundation for testers. Since the Java regular expression library is not as elegant or convenient as Python when using regular expressions, HaE requires users to use () to extract what they need The expression content contains; for example, if you want to match a response message of a Shiro application, the normal matching rule is rememberMe=delete, if you want to extract this content, you need to become (rememberMe=delete). [hide][Hidden Content]]
  21. Description Ethical hacking is a process of detecting vulnerabilities in an application, system, or organization’s infrastructure that an attacker can use to exploit an individual or organization. They use this process to prevent cyber attacks and security breaches by lawfully hacking into the systems and looking for weak points. Confidentiality, integrity and availability, also known as the CIA triad, is a model designed to guide policies for information security within an organization. The model is also sometimes referred to as the AIC triad (availability, integrity and confidentiality) to avoid confusion with the Central Intelligence Agency. Network security is the protection of the underlying networking infrastructure from unauthorized access, misuse, or theft. It involves creating a secure infrastructure for devices, applications, users, and applications to work in a secure manner. What is Nmap ? Nmap is a free and open-source network scanner created by Gordon Lyon. Nmap is used to discover hosts and services on a computer network by sending packets and analyzing the responses. Nmap provides a number of features for probing computer networks, including host discovery and service and operating system detection. Some of this tool’s best features are that it’s open-source, free, multi-platform and receives constant updates each year. It also has a big plus: it’s one of the most complete host and network and port scanners available. It includes a large set of options to enhance your scanning and mapping tasks, and brings with it an incredible community and comprehensive documentation to help you understand this tool from the very start. Nmap can be used to Create a complete computer network map. Find remote IP addresses of any hosts. Get the OS system and software details. Detect open ports on local and remote systems. Audit server security standards. Find vulnerabilities on remote and local hosts. It was mentioned in the Top 20 OSINT Tools article we published, and today we’ll explore a little bit more about this essential security tool with some practical terminal-based Nmap commands. What is Wireshark ? Wireshark is a free and open-source packet analyzer. It is used for network troubleshooting, analysis, software and communications protocol development, and education. Originally named Ethereal, the project was renamed Wireshark in May 2006 due to trademark issues. Who this course is for Cyber Security Engineer Ethical Hackers Penetration testers Anyone interested in network security and ethical hacking Requirements Eager to Learn ! [hide][Hidden Content]]
  22. PHP malware scanner Traversing directories for files with php extensions and testing files against text or regexp rules, the rules-based on self-gathered samples and publicly available malwares/webshells. The goal is to find infected files and fight against kiddies, because too easy to bypass rules. Changelog v1.0.14 Backdoor reported in #72 [hide][Hidden Content]]
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  24. Description Ethical hacking, penetration testing, hacking, Metasploit, pentesting, pentest, password cracking, ddos, penetration, cracking, metasploit framework, Nmap, cyber security, cybersecurity, security hacking, hacking tools, Linux, Linux administration, kali linux, kali. Hi there, Welcome to “Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Bootcamp with Linux! “ Penetration Testing, Pentesting, and Ethical Hacking Complete Course with Metasploit, Kali Linux, Password Cracking, Nmap. Whether you want to get your first job in IT security, become a white hat hacker, or prepare to check the security of your own home network, this ethical hacking course offers practical and accessible ethical hacking lectures to help keep your networks safe from cybercriminals. Ethical hacking (or penetration testing) involves a hacker agreeing with an organization or individual who authorizes the hacker to levy cyber attacks on a system or network to expose potential vulnerabilities. Penetration testing skills make you a more marketable IT tech. Understanding how to exploit servers, networks, and applications means that you will also be able to better prevent malicious exploitation. From website and network hacking, to pen testing in Metasploit, Oak Academy has a course for you. Linux is available in a range of different distributions that are tailored to the needs and skills of their users. Simple distributions, like openSUSE, are great for personal computing, while Linux Ubuntu is ideal for network admins and computer scientists. Linux has a somewhat inaccurate reputation as being a much more technical and complex alternative to mainstay operating systems like Windows and macOS. In reality, Linux is an approachable, open-source, and customizable OS that’s designed to address huge deficiencies in commercial operating systems. “Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Bootcamp with Linux“ covers Linux basics and Ethical Hacking. You will learn Linux fundamental skills; Command line, Linux Administration, Ethical Hacking Penetration Testing (Pentest+) with Free Hacking Tools as Nmap. In this course, you will learn Kali Linux fundamentals, how to use basic commands, how Linux File hierarchy is, how to set the network of Linux, how to install packages from package managers and source code, how to manage services, processes and monitoring, network fundemantals, Vulnerability scan, information gathering, learning pentest steps and many tools that you will use in pentest. Our “ Ethical Hacking Bootcamp Course! is for everyone! If you don’t have any previous experience, not a problem! This course is expertly designed to teach everyone from complete beginners, right through to pro hackers. You’ll go from beginner to extremely high-level and I will take you through each step with hands-on examples. And if you are a pro Ethical Hacker, then take this course to quickly absorb the latest skills, while refreshing existing ones. The good news is: All applications and tools recommended are free. So you don’t need to buy any tool or application. Our course, just as our other courses on Udemy, is focused on the practical side of penetration testing and ethical hacking but I also will share with you the theory side of each attack and Linux basics. Before jumping into Penetration Testing or other practices with Ethical Hacking tools you will first learn how to set up a lab and install needed software on your machine. In this course, you will have a chance to keep yourself up-to-date and equip yourself with a range of Ethical Hacking skills. When you finish this course you will learn the most effective steps to prevent attacks and detect adversaries with actionable techniques that you can directly apply when you get back to work. I am coming from the field and I will be sharing my 20 years of experience with all of you. So you will also learn tips and tricks from me so that you can win the battle against the wide range of cyber adversaries that want to harm your environment. Our Student says that: This is the best tech-related course I’ve taken and I have taken quite a few. Having limited networking experience and absolutely no experience with hacking or ethical hacking, I’ve learned, practiced, and understood how to perform hacks in just a few days. I was an absolute novice when it came to anything related to penetration testing and cybersecurity. After taking this course for over a month, I’m much more familiar and comfortable with the terms and techniques and plan to use them soon in bug bounties. FAQ regarding Ethical Hacking and Linux : What is Linux and why should I use it? Linux is an operating system (OS), which is the primary software that a computer uses to execute tasks and communicate directions to its hardware. The operating system that competes the most with Linux is Windows. Linux is a popular and widely-used OS because it is open-source, meaning that it is free to the public, and anyone can modify and customize Linux software as they wish. The reasons to use Linux can vary from developing an app or building a video game to learning how to hack computer systems. As Linux is one of the most popular operating systems, many developers use it to develop their web applications and software programs. This means knowledge of Linux is important for anyone working with computers and software in general. Learning how to work with Linux is a necessary skill for anyone pursuing a career in ethical hacking or penetration testing Why do hackers use Linux? Both ethical (white hat) hackers and malicious (black hat) hackers often prefer to use the Linux operating system (OS) over Windows OS. The biggest reason hackers turn to Linux is because it is far more accessible to a wider range of people than Windows OS offers. Linux is free, open-source, and provides a well-integrated command-line interface for users to customize the OS. This means anyone can modify Linux to create their own programs and software. Malicious hackers often opt for Linux because it gives them more control when using Linux, and ethical hackers need to be well-versed in Linux because it’s so popular among black hat hackers. Ethical hackers also often prefer using Linux as it has better existing security measures than Windows and doesn’t usually require third-party antivirus software. How long will it take to learn Linux and how can I teach it to myself? The time it takes to learn Linux can vary, depending on whether you have existing background knowledge of other operating systems and how deep of an understanding you want to gain. For beginners learning Linux to pursue a career in IT or software administration, you may only need a basic understanding of how to navigate and execute functions using Linux and how applications built on Linux behave. If you plan to become an ethical hacker, or pentester, you may need a more in-depth knowledge of Linux security procedures and a skill in manipulating Linux programs. You can learn Linux on your own time by seeking out video tutorials and online courses. There are plenty of courses available on Udemy that teach the fundamentals of Linux and more advanced Linux skills. What careers use Linux? Many jobs in IT, software development, and cybersecurity rely on Linux skills and expertise. A career in app development generally requires a deep understanding of Linux, as many app developers use Linux as a basis for their applications. Software-focused career paths that frequently use Linux include developer and software engineering roles for Python, Java, and Linux systems. Nearly any role in cybersecurity, such as a penetration tester or ethical hacker, requires a strong knowledge of Linux. With Linux expertise and skills, you could work as a system administrator, IT professional, system architect, or database administrator. You may even work in website development, maintenance, or security, as people in those roles build a majority of their web applications on Linux. What is the core of the Linux operating system? The core component of any operating system is called the kernel. Linux’s core is simply referred to as the Linux kernel. The Linux kernel is a single program that manages crucial tasks such as allocating memory, communicating software functions to the computer’s CPU, and comprehending all of the input and output from the computer’s hardware. The kernel is the most important part of an OS and often runs in a separate area from the rest of a computer’s software. The kernel is just one part of a full operating system, which includes a combination of components such as the bootloader, init system, graphical server, desktop environment, and more. The name “Linux” can refer to both the kernel itself (the Linux kernel) and an operating system built around that kernel. For example, the Android OS and the Ubuntu distribution are both made using the Linux kernel. What are the best Linux distributions for beginners? There is a wide range of Linux distributions to choose from when learning and working with Linux. When you are first learning Linux, the distribution you choose to learn may depend on how you plan to apply your Linux skills. If you are pursuing a career in cybersecurity, you may select a different Linux distribution to start with than someone pursuing a career in game development, for instance. Online courses are some of the best resources for beginners to Linux, as they will give guidance on which Linux distribution is a good fit for the intended application of Linux. For beginners, a few of the most highly recommended Linux distributions include Elementary OS, Ubuntu Linux, and Ubuntu Budgie. Other distributions that are considered easy to learn and master are Linux Mint, Zorin OS, Nitrux, Kodachi, Rescatux, and Parrot Security. What is Ethical Hacking and what is it used for? Ethical hacking involves a hacker agreeing with an organization or individual who authorizes the hacker to levy cyber attacks on a system or network to expose potential vulnerabilities. An ethical hacker is also sometimes referred to as a white hat hacker. Many depend on ethical hackers to identify weaknesses in their networks, endpoints, devices, or applications. The hacker informs their client as to when they will be attacking the system, as well as the scope of the attack. An ethical hacker operates within the confines of their agreement with their client. They cannot work to discover vulnerabilities and then demand payment to fix them. This is what gray hat hackers do. Ethical hackers are also different from black hat hackers, who hack to harm others or benefit themselves without permission. Is Ethical Hacking a good career? Yes, ethical hacking is a good career because it is one of the best ways to test a network. An ethical hacker tries to locate vulnerabilities in the network by testing different hacking techniques on them. In many situations, a network seems impenetrable only because it hasn’t succumbed to an attack in years. However, this could be because black hat hackers are using the wrong kinds of methods. An ethical hacker can show a company how they may be vulnerable by levying a new type of attack that no one has ever tried before. When they successfully penetrate the system, the organization can then set up defenses to protect against this kind of penetration. This unique security opportunity makes the skills of an ethical hacker desirable for organizations that want to ensure their systems are well-defended against cybercriminals. Who is best suited for a career in Ethical Hacking? Ethical hackers are generally experts in programming, cybersecurity, security analysis, and networking infrastructure. Ethical hackers tend to be out-of-the-box thinkers. Many hackers rely on creative means of attack, such as social engineering. Those who are experts within systems, who can easily see flaws within systems, and who love repetitive but creative work (such as quality assurance) are well-suited to working as ethical hackers. Ethical hackers will usually know multiple programming languages and have expertise in a multitude of security tools. A recent graduate might study programming, quality assurance, and systems security to prepare for such a role. What are common career paths for someone in Ethical Hacking? Many ethical hackers are freelancers who work off something called “bug bounties.” Bug bounties are small contracts that companies, often large companies, send out for finding errors within their products. An ethical hacker can make thousands of dollars by reporting a single bug within a system. Other ethical hackers work within applications development companies to ensure that their products are as secure as possible. Therefore, an ethical hacker may be a freelance hacker, a software engineer, or a security analyst. Ethical hackers may also be able to easily move into roles in cybersecurity, such as cybersecurity architects, cybersecurity administrators, and cybersecurity engineers. Is Ethical Hacking legal? Yes, ethical hacking is legal because the hacker has full, expressed permission to test the vulnerabilities of a system. An ethical hacker operates within constraints stipulated by the person or organization for which they work, and this agreement makes for a legal arrangement. An ethical hacker is like someone who handles quality control for a car manufacturer. They may have to try to break certain components of the vehicle such as the windshield, suspension system, transmission, or engine to see where they are weak or how they can improve them. With ethical hacking, the hacker is trying to “break” the system to ascertain how it can be less vulnerable to cyberattacks. However, if an ethical hacker attacks an area of a network or computer without getting expressed permission from the owner, they could be considered a gray hat hacker, violating ethical hacking principles. What are the different types of hackers? The different types of hackers include white hat hackers who are ethical hackers and are authorized to hack systems, black hat hackers who are cybercriminals, and grey hat hackers, who fall in-between and may not damage your system but hack for personal gain. There are also red hat hackers who attack black hat hackers directly. Some call new hackers green hat hackers. These people aspire to be full-blown, respected hackers. State-sponsored hackers work for countries and hacktivists and use hacking to support or promote a philosophy. Sometimes a hacker can act as a whistleblower, hacking their own organization in order to expose hidden practices. There are also script kiddies and blue hat hackers. A script kiddie tries to impress their friends by launching scripts and download tools to take down websites and networks. When a script kiddie gets angry at another hacker and seeks retaliation, they then become known as a blue hat hacker. What skills do Ethical Hackers need to know? In addition to proficiency in basic computer skills and use of the command line, ethical hackers must also develop technical skills related to programming, database management systems (DBMS), use of the Linux operating system (OS), cryptography, creation and management of web applications and computer networks like DHCP, NAT, and Subnetting. Becoming an ethical hacker involves learning at least one programming language and having a working knowledge of other common languages like Python, SQL, C++, and C. Ethical hackers must have strong problem-solving skills and the ability to think critically to come up with and test new solutions for securing systems. Ethical hackers should also understand how to use reverse engineering to uncover specifications and check a system for vulnerabilities by analyzing its code. What is the Certified Ethical Hacker ( CEH ) Certification Exam? The Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification exam supports and tests the knowledge of auditors, security officers, site administrators, security professionals, and anyone else who wants to ensure a network is safe against cybercriminals. With the CEH credential, you can design and govern the minimum standards necessary for credentialing information that security professionals need to engage in ethical hacking. You can also make it known to the public if someone who has earned their CEH credentials has met or exceeded the minimum standards. You are also empowered to reinforce the usefulness and self-regulated nature of ethical hacking. The CEH exam doesn’t cater to specific security hardware or software vendors, such as Fortinet, Avira, Kaspersky, Cisco, or others, making it a vendor-neutral program. What is the Certified Information Security Manager ( CISM ) exam? Passing the Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) exam indicates that the credentialed individual is an expert in the governance of information security, developing security programs and managing them, as well as managing incidents and risk. For someone to be considered “certified,” they must have passed the exam within the last five years, as well as work full-time in a related career, such as information security and IT administration. The exam tests individuals’ knowledge regarding the risks facing different systems, how to develop programs to assess and mitigate these risks, and how to ensure an organization’s information systems conform to internal and regulatory policies. The exam also assesses how a person can use tools to help an organization recover from a successful attack. FAQ regarding Penetration Testing : What is penetration testing? Penetration testing, or pen testing, is the process of attacking an enterprise’s network to find any vulnerabilities that could be present to be patched. Ethical hackers and security experts carry out these tests to find any weak spots in a system’s security before hackers with malicious intent find them and exploit them. Someone who has no previous knowledge of the system’s security usually performs these tests, making it easier to find vulnerabilities that the development team may have overlooked. You can perform penetration testing using manual or automated technologies to compromise servers, web applications, wireless networks, network devices, mobile devices, and other exposure points. What are the different types of penetration testing? There are many types of penetration testing. Internal penetration testing tests an enterprise’s internal network. This test can determine how much damage can be caused by an employee. An external penetration test targets a company’s externally facing technology like their website or their network. Companies use these tests to determine how an anonymous hacker can attack a system. In a covert penetration test, also known as a double-blind penetration test, few people in the company will know that a pen test is occurring, including any security professional. This type of test will test not only systems but a company’s response to an active attack. With a closed-box penetration test, a hacker may know nothing about the enterprise under attack other than its name. In an open-box test, the hacker will receive some information about a company’s security to aid them in the attack. What are the different stages of penetration testing? Penetration tests have five different stages. The first stage defines the goals and scope of the test and the testing methods that will be used. Security experts will also gather intelligence on the company’s system to better understand the target. The second stage of a pen test is scanning the target application or network to determine how they will respond to an attack. You can do this through a static analysis of application code and dynamic scans of running applications and networks. The third stage is the attack phase when possible vulnerabilities discovered in the last stage are attacked with various hacking methods. In the fourth stage of a penetration test, the tester attempts to maintain access to the system to steal any sensitive data or damaging systems. The fifth and final stage of a pen test is the reporting phase when testers compile the test results. Here is the list of what you’ll learn by the end of the course, Linux Introduction to Linux Basic Linux Commands Configuring Kali Linux Package management Monitoring Setting Up The Laboratory Set Up Kali Linux from VM Set Up Kali Linux from ISO File Set Up a Victim: Metasploitable Linux Set Up a Victim: OWASP Broken Web Applications Set Up a Victim: Windows System Penetration Test Penetration Test Types Security Audit Vulnerability Scan Penetration Test Approaches: Black Box to White Box Penetration Test Phases: Reconnaissance to Reporting Legal Issues Testing Standards Network Scan Network Scan Types Passive Scan With Wireshark Passive Scan with ARP Tables Active Scan with Hping Hping for Another Purpose: DDos Nmap for Active Network Scan Ping Scan to Enumerate Network Hosts Port Scan with Nmap SYN Scan, TCP Scan, UDP Scan Version & Operating System Detection Input & Output Management in Nmap Nmap Scripting Engine How to Bypass Security Measures in Nmap Scans Some Other Types of Scans: XMAS, ACK, etc. Idle (Stealth) Scan Vulnerability Scan Introduction to Vulnerability Scan Introduction to a Vulnerability Scanner: Nessus Nessus: Download, Install & Setup Nessus: Creating a Custom Policy Nessus: First Scan An Aggressive Scan Nessus: Report Function Exploitation Exploitation Terminologies Exploit Databases Manual Exploitation Exploitation Frameworks Metasploit Framework (MSF) Introduction to MSF Console MSF Console & How to Run an Exploit Introduction to Meterpreter Gaining a Meterpreter Session Meterpreter Basics Pass the Hash: Hack Even There is No Vulnerability Post-Exploitation Persistence: What is it? Persistence Module of Meterpreter Removing a Persistence Backdoor Next Generation Persistence Meterpreter for Post-Exploitation with Extensions: Core, Stdapi, Mimikatz… Post Modules of Metasploit Framework (MSF) Collecting Sensitive Data in Post-Exploitation Phase Password Cracking Password Hashes of Windows Systems Password Hashes of Linux Systems Classification of Password Cracking Password Cracking Tools in Action: Hydra, Cain and Abel, John the Ripper… OSINT (Open Source Intelligent) & Information Gathering Over the Internet Introduction to Information Gathering Using Search Engines to Gather Information Search Engine Tools: SiteDigger and SearchDiggity Shodan Gathering Information About the People Web Archives FOCA – Fingerprinting Organisations with Collected Archives Fingerprinting Tools: The Harvester and Recon-NG Maltego – Visual Link Analysis Tool Hacking Web Applications Terms and Standards Intercepting HTTP & HTTPS Traffics with Burp Suite An Automated Tool: Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP) in Details Information Gathering and Configuration Flaws Input & Output Manipulation Cross Site Scripting (XSS) Reflected XSS, Stored XSS and DOM-Based XSS BeEF – The Browser Exploitation Framework SQL Injection Authentication Flaws Online Password Cracking Authorisation Flaws Path Traversal Attack Session Management Session Fixation Attack Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) Social Engineering & Phishing Attacks Social Engineering Terminologies Creating Malware – Terminologies MSF Venom Veil to Create Custom Payloads TheFatRat – Installation and Creating a Custom Malware Embedding Malware in PDF Files Embedding Malware in Word Documents Embedding Malware in Firefox Add-ons Empire Project in Action Exploiting Java Vulnerabilities Social Engineering Toolkit (SET) for Phishing Sending Fake Emails for Phishing Voice Phishing: Vishing Network Fundamentals Reference Models: OSI vs. TCP/IP Demonstration of OSI Layers Using Wireshark Data Link Layer (Layer 2) Standards & Protocols Layer 2: Ethernet – Principles, Frames & Headers Layer 2: ARP – Address Resolution Protocol Layer 2: VLANs (Virtual Local Area Networks) Layer 2: WLANs (Wireless Local Area Networks) Introduction to Network Layer (Layer 3) Layer 3: IP (Internet Protocol) Layer 3: IPv4 Addressing System Layer 3: IPv4 Subnetting Layer 3: Private Networks Layer 3: NAT (Network Address Translation) Layer 3: IPv6 Layer 3: DHCP – How the Mechanism Works Layer 3: ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) Layer 3: Traceroute Introduction to Transport Layer (Layer 4) Layer 4: TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) Layer 4: UDP (User Datagram Protocol) Introduction to Application Layer (Layer 5 to 7) Layer 7: DNS (Domain Name System) Layer 7: HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol) Layer 7: HTTPS Network Layer & Layer-2 Attacks Creating Network with GNS3 Network Sniffing: The “Man in the Middle” (MitM) Network Sniffing: TCPDump Network Sniffing: Wireshark Active Network Devices: Router, Switch, Hub MAC Flood Using Macof ARP Spoof ARP Cache Poisoning using Ettercap DHCP Starvation & DHCP Spoofing VLAN Hopping: Switch Spoofing, Double Tagging Reconnaissance on Network Devices Cracking the Passwords of the Services of Network Devices Compromising SNMP: Finding Community Names Using NMAP Scripts Compromising SNMP: Write Access Check Using SNMP-Check Tool Compromising SNMP: Grabbing SNMP Configuration Using Metasploit Weaknesses of the Network Devices Password Creation Methods of Cisco Routers Identity Management in the Network Devices ACLs (Access Control Lists) in Cisco Switches & Routers SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) Security Network Hacking · Network Security · ethical · Ethical Intelligence · nmap nessus · nmap course · nmap metaspolit · Complete nmap · Kali linux nmap · ethical hacking · penetration testing · bug bounty · hack · cyber security · kali linux · android hacking · network security · hacking · security · security testing · nmap · metasploit · metasploit framework · penetration testing · oscp · security testing · windows hacking · exploit · bug bounty · bug bounty hunting · website hacking · web hacking · pentest+ · pentest plus · OSINT (Open Source Intelligent ) · social engineering · phishing · social engineering tool kit You’ll also get: · Lifetime Access to The Course · Fast & Friendly Support in the Q&A section · Udemy Certificate of Completion Ready for Download Enroll now to become a professional Ethical Hacker! See you in the Ethical Hacking Bootcamp Course! Penetration Testing (Pentest+) and Ethical Hacking Complete Course with Kali Linux, Metasploit, Password Cracking, Nmap. IMPORTANT: This course is created for educational purposes and all the information learned should be used when the attacker is authorized. Who this course is for: People who want to start Ethical Hacking, Penetration Testing and Linux from scratch and to move more advanced level. People who want to learn about Ethical hacking, penetration testing, hacking, metasploit, pentesting, pentest, password cracking,nmap. People who want to take their Hacking, pentesting skills to the next level System administrators who are on the front lines defending their systems and responding to attacks Anyone who want to learn Linux, kali linux, linux basic, linux fundamental. Other security personnel who are first responders when systems come under attack Anyone who wants to learn how new operating systems work by improving their existing computer knowledge and skills Employees of organizations planning to change Microsoft operating systems. Leaders of incident handling teams People who are cyber security experts People who want transition to Cyber Security Incident handlers Anyone who wants to learn ethical hacking Anyone who want to learn Linux Anyone who want deep dive into Linux world Those looking for alternatives to Microsoft operating systems. Anyone who want deep dive into Linux world Requirements A strong desire to understand Ethical Hacking, Penetration Testing, Hacker Tools and Techniques. A strong desire to understand hacking, metasploit, pentesting, pentest, password cracking,nmap, cyber security, cybersecurity, security hacking. A strong desire to understand linux, linux administration, linux basic,linux fundamental, kali linux, kali. Be able to download and install all the free software and tools needed to practice in Hacking All items referenced in this ethical hacking course are Free A strong work ethic, willingness to learn and plenty of excitement about the back door of the digital world Curiosity for Linux, Linux Administration, Linux Command Line Minimum 8 GB RAM for ethical hacking and penetration testing 100 GB Free Harddisk space for ethical hacking course 64-bit processor for ethical hacking and penetration testing course Nothing else! It’s just you, your computer and your ambition to get started today in penetration testing 4 GB (Gigabytes) of RAM or higher (8 GB recommended) 64-bit system processor is mandatory 10 GB or more disk space Enable virtualization technology on BIOS settings, such as “Intel-VTx” A strong work ethic, willingness to learn Linux Environments Nothing else! It’s just you, your computer and your ambition to get started today [Hidden Content] [hide][Hidden Content]]
  25. VPN Overall Reconnaissance, Testing, Enumeration and Exploitation Toolkit Overview A very simple Python framework, inspired by SprayingToolkit, that tries to automate most of the process required to detect, enumerate and attack common O365 and VPN endpoints (like Cisco, Citrix, Fortinet, Pulse, etc...). Why I developed it Make the VPN spraying phase much quicker and easier. Also, due to its flexibility, this tool can be added to an existing OSINT workflow pretty easily. What the tool can do for you Vortex mainly provide assistance with performing the following tasks: User Search and Collection LinkedIn Google PwnDB Password Leaks PwnDB Main Domain Identification OWA S4B/Lynk ADFS Subdomain Search Enumeration Bruteforce VPN Endpoint Detection Password Spraying/Guessing attacks O365 Lynk/S4B ADFS IMAP VPNs Cisco Citrix FortiNet Pulse Secure SonicWall Search profiles on Social Networks Instagram Facebook Twitter TikTok Onlyfans [hide][Hidden Content]]