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Tox

Found 37 results

  1. PageTableInjection Code Injection, Inject malicious payload via pagetables pml4. Introduction This is just a proof-of-concept of the page table injection technique to inject malicious code into the arbitrary user processes. On Windows(and some modern OSes), every process has a its PML4 a.k.a Directory Table Base. Thus the process A cannot access process B without APIs. but how about if we can inject arbitrary PML4 entry? of course, the PML4 entry will point to the corresponding physical address of entries, PDP, PD, and PT as exactly the same as the backing process. In order to inject malicious PML4 entry to the target process, we need to have an actual resident page (physical memory) that backing the malicious PML4 entry. Thus literally the resident page must be a resident, otherwise, the system will crash or would become unstable, because, during the MMU translating to the physical address, there is nothing that MMU expects, as well as there is nothing the windows memory manager has nothing expects. Let’s look at the both backing process and target process buffers. In this case, the buffers are: Backing Process VA: 0x1A45F810000 Deployment Process Injected VA: 0x6EA45F810000 Before step to the next, some of you may think that the 2nd address(0x6EA45F810000) looks weird like usually, we allocated buffer via malloc or VirtualAlloc, the virtual address should look like 0x17C7CAC0000 0x23BE9D80000 0x19FE76F0000 or some sort of these. it’s because the malicious PML4 entry is not involved to the memory manager of windows, and is not managed as well. of course every virtual address on Windows 64-bit process could possibly have any value within a range of user memory range. So if we look into both addresses… [hide][Hidden Content]]
  2. What is DNSStager? DNSStager is an open-source project based on Python used to hide and transfer your payload using DNS. DNSStager will create a malicious DNS server that handles DNS requests to your domain and return your payload as a response to specific record requests such as AAAA or TXT records after splitting it into chunks and encoding the payload using different algorithms. It can generate a custom agent written in C or GoLang that will resolve a sequence of domains, retrieve the payload, decode it and finally inject it into the memory based on any technique you want. You can edit the code of the DNSStager agent as you wish, and build it using your own custom execution techniques. The main goal of using DNSStager is to help red teamers/pentesters to deliver their payloads in the stealthy channel using DNS. How does it work? Based on your DNS resolution option, DNSStager will split your payload into chunks and save each chunk of the payload as a response for a subdomain. For example, if you choose IPV6 as your option to retrieve the payload, the DNS response will be something like: cloud-srv-1.test.mydnsserver.live. 300 IN AAAA 5648:31d2:6548:8b52:6048:8b52:1848:8b52 Where 5648:31d2:6548:8b52:6048:8b52:1848:8b52 is a part of your payload? So, the agent will resolve some domains to retrieve the payload and then decode it and finally inject it into memory. Currently, DNSStager only supports two records, AAAA and TXT. You can encode your payload using XOR for the AAAA record and by default, it will be encoded as base64 if you choose TXT record. DNSStager key features: DNSStager has some key features such as: Hide and Resolve your payload in IPV6 records. Hide and Resolve your payload in TXT records. XOR encoder to encode your payload. Base64 encoder to encode your payload (only for TXT records). Pure agent wrote in C with the ability to customise it. Pure agent wrote in GoLang with the ability to customise it. The ability to use sleep between each DNS request. AND MUCH MORE TO COME! [hide][Hidden Content]]
  3. Mystikal is a macOS payload generator integrated with Mythic. Mystikal leverages Mythic scripting to log in and creates the necessary payload for the selected initial access method. Mystikal creates an Apfell or Leviathan payload depending on the chosen initial access method. A common payload used for initial access is the installer package. These packages are eXtensible ARchiver (XAR) archives that conform to a specific folder structure and have a .pkg file extension. The easy comparison to Windows would be Windows installers which typically have the .msi file extension. As with Windows installers, installer packages execution typically results in an install wizard presented to the end-user for installation. For offensive use, typical installer package execution relies upon preinstall and postinstall scripts, which are simple bash scripts that execute during the installation process. An alternative method depends upon the abuse of JavaScript within distribution Extensible Markup Language (XML) files using InstallerJS. Apple’s InstallerJS is an Application Programming Interface (API) leveraged in distribution XML files to perform installation checks. Within the InstallerJS API is the system.run tag, which can execute system commands. The Silver Sparrow malware recently used this method. By abusing the distribution XML file, attackers can perform the same tasks typically within preinstall / postinstall scripts. The benefit of this method is that it makes it slightly harder to see what actions the installer package is performing. Additionally, due to the invocation time of the distribution XML file, the installer package does not need to finish the installation process for execution to occur. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  4. HatVenom HatSploit native powerful payload generation and shellcode injection tool that provides support for common platforms and architectures. Features Support for most common executable formats like elf, macho, pe. Support for most common architectures like x64, x86, aarch64, armle, mipsle, mipsbe. Ability to modify shellcode by changing pre-defined offsets. Basic functions There are all HatVenom basic functions that can be used to generate a payload, covert data, or inject shellcode. ip_bytes(ip) – Converts IP address to bytes allowed by the shellcode. port_bytes(port) – Converts numeric port to bytes allowed by the shellcode. string_bytes(string) – Converts a string to bytes allowed by the shellcode. generate(file_format, arch, shellcode, offsets={}) – Generates payload for specified target and with specified shellcode. generate_to(file_format, arch, shellcode, offsets={}, filename=’a.out’) – Generates payload for specified target and with specified shellcode and saves it to the specified file. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  5. ScareCrow is a payload creation framework for generating loaders for the use of side loading (not injection) into a legitimate Windows process (bypassing Application Whitelisting controls). Once the DLL loader is loaded into memory, utilizing a technique to flush an EDR’s hook out the system DLLs running in the process’s memory. This works because we know the EDR’s hooks are placed when a process is spawned. ScareCrow can target these DLLs and manipulate them in memory by using the API function VirtualProtect, which changes a section of a process’ memory permissions to a different value, specifically from Execute–Read to Read-Write-Execute. When executed, ScareCrow will copy the bytes of the system DLLs stored on disk in C:\Windows\System32\. These DLLs are stored on disk “clean” of EDR hooks because they are used by the system to load an unaltered copy into a new process when it’s spawned. Since EDR’s only hook these processes in memory, they remain unaltered. ScareCrow does not copy the entire DLL file, instead only focuses on the .text section of the DLLs. This section of a DLL contains the executable assembly, and by doing this ScareCrow helps reduce the likelihood of detection as re-reading entire files can cause an EDR to detect that there is a modification to a system resource. The data is then copied into the right region of memory by using each function’s offset. Each function has an offset which denotes the exact number of bytes from the base address where they reside, providing the function’s location on the stack. In order to do this, ScareCrow changes the permissions of the .text region of memory using VirtualProtect. Even though this is a system DLL, since it has been loaded into our process (that we control), we can change the memory permissions without requiring elevated privileges. Once these the hooks are removed, ScareCrow then utilizes custom System Calls to load and run shellcode in memory. ScareCrow does this even after the EDR hooks are removed to help avoid being detected by non-userland hooked-based telemetry gathering tools such as Event Tracing for Windows (ETW) or other event logging mechanisms. These custom system calls are also used to perform the VirtualProtect call to remove the hooks placed by EDRs, described above, to avoid being detected an any EDR’s anti-tamper controls. This is done by calling a custom version of the VirtualProtect syscall, NtProtectVirtualMemory. ScareCrow utilizes Golang to generate these loaders and then assembly for these custom syscall functions. ScareCrow loads the shellcode into memory by first decrypting the shellcode, which is encrypted by default using AES encryption with a decryption and initialisation vector key. Once decrypted and loaded, the shellcode is then executed. Depending on the loader options specified ScareCrow will set up different export functions for the DLL. The loaded DLL also does not contain the standard DLLmain function which all DLLs typically need to operate. The DLL will still execute without an issue because the process we load into will look for those export functions and not worry about DLLMain being there. During the creation process of the loader, ScareCrow utilizes a library for blending into the background after a beacon calls home. This library does two things: Code signs the Loader: Files that are signed with code signing certificates are often put under less scrutiny, making it easier to be executed without being challenged, as files signed by a trusted name are often less suspicious than others. Most antimalware products don’t have the time to validate and verify these certificates (now some do but typically the common vendor names are included in a whitelist) ScareCrow creates these certificates by using a go package version of the tool limelighter to create a pfx12 file. This package takes an inputted domain name, specified by the user, to create a code signing certificate for that domain. If needed, you can also use your own code signing certificate if you have one, using the valid command-line option. Spoof the attributes of the loader: This is done by using syso files which are a form of embedded resource files that when compiled along with our loader, will modify the attribute portions of our compiled code. Prior to generating a syso file, ScareCrow will generate a random file name (based on the loader type) to use. Once chosen this file name will map to the associated attributes for that file name, ensuring that the right values are assigned. Changelog v2.0 New Features Introduced ETW bypass mechanisms to prevent ETW events from being generated. Introduced unhooked process Injection techniques to unhook an EDR from the injected process. Added a flag to allow a custom set of JSON for Attribute Spoofing. Add a new list of DLLs for the WScript loader option. Added anti-attribution controls in binary mode. Bug Fixes Fixed some command line bugs. Updated help menu & README. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  6. MeterPwrShell Automated Tool That Generate A Powershell Oneliner That Can Create Meterpreter Shell On Metasploit,Bypass AMSI,Bypass Firewall,Bypass UAC,And Bypass Any AVs. This tool is powered by Metasploit-Framework and amsi.fail Notes NEVER UPLOAD THE PAYLOAD THAT GENERATED BY THIS PROGRAM TO ANY ONLINE SCANNER NEVER USE THIS PROGRAM FOR MALICIOUS PURPOSE SPREADING THE PAYLOAD THAT GENERATED BY THIS PROGRAM IS NOT COOL ANY DAMAGE GENERATED BY THIS PROGRAM IS NOT MY (As the program maker) RESPONSIBILTY!!! If you have some feature recommendation,post that on Issue If you have some issue with the program,try redownloading it again (trust me),cause sometimes i edit the release and fix it without telling If you want to know how tf my payload bypass any AVs,you can check on this and this Dont even try to fork this repository,you'll dont get the releases! Features (v1.5.1) Bypass UAC Automatic Migrate (using PrependMigrate) Built-in GetSYSTEM (if u use the Bypass UAC option) Disable All Firewall Profile (if u use the Bypass UAC option) Fully Bypass Windows Defender Real-time Protection (if you choose shortened payload or using Bypass UAC or both) Disable Windows Defender Security Features (if u use the Bypass UAC option) Fully unkillable payload Bypasses AMSI Successfully (if you choose shortened payload) Short One-Liner (if you choose shortened payload) Bypass Firewall (If you pick an unstaged payload) Great CLI A Lot More (Try it by yourself) [hide][Hidden Content]]
  7. ScareCrow ScareCrow is a payload creation framework for generating loaders for the use of side loading (not injection) into a legitimate Windows process (bypassing Application Whitelisting controls). Once the DLL loader is loaded into memory, utilizing a technique to flush an EDR’s hook out the system DLLs running in the process’s memory. This works because we know the EDR’s hooks are placed when a process is spawned. ScareCrow can target these DLLs and manipulate them in memory by using the API function VirtualProtect, which changes a section of a process’ memory permissions to a different value, specifically from Execute–Read to Read-Write-Execute. When executed, ScareCrow will copy the bytes of the system DLLs stored on disk in C:\Windows\System32\. These DLLs are stored on disk “clean” of EDR hooks because they are used by the system to load an unaltered copy into a new process when it’s spawned. Since EDR’s only hook these processes in memory, they remain unaltered. ScareCrow does not copy the entire DLL file, instead only focuses on the .text section of the DLLs. This section of a DLL contains the executable assembly, and by doing this ScareCrow helps reduce the likelihood of detection as re-reading entire files can cause an EDR to detect that there is a modification to a system resource. The data is then copied into the right region of memory by using each function’s offset. Each function has an offset which denotes the exact number of bytes from the base address where they reside, providing the function’s location on the stack. In order to do this, ScareCrow changes the permissions of the .text region of memory using VirtualProtect. Even though this is a system DLL, since it has been loaded into our process (that we control), we can change the memory permissions without requiring elevated privileges. Once these the hooks are removed, ScareCrow then utilizes custom System Calls to load and run shellcode in memory. ScareCrow does this even after the EDR hooks are removed to help avoid being detected by non-userland hooked-based telemetry gathering tools such as Event Tracing for Windows (ETW) or other event logging mechanisms. These custom system calls are also used to perform the VirtualProtect call to remove the hooks placed by EDRs, described above, to avoid being detected an any EDR’s anti-tamper controls. This is done by calling a custom version of the VirtualProtect syscall, NtProtectVirtualMemory. ScareCrow utilizes Golang to generate these loaders and then assembly for these custom syscall functions. ScareCrow loads the shellcode into memory by first decrypting the shellcode, which is encrypted by default using AES encryption with a decryption and initialisation vector key. Once decrypted and loaded, the shellcode is then executed. Depending on the loader options specified ScareCrow will set up different export functions for the DLL. The loaded DLL also does not contain the standard DLLmain function which all DLLs typically need to operate. The DLL will still execute without an issue because the process we load into will look for those export functions and not worry about DLLMain being there. During the creation process of the loader, ScareCrow utilizes a library for blending into the background after a beacon calls home. This library does two things: Code signs the Loader: Files that are signed with code signing certificates are often put under less scrutiny, making it easier to be executed without being challenged, as files signed by a trusted name are often less suspicious than others. Most antimalware products don’t have the time to validate and verify these certificates (now some do but typically the common vendor names are included in a whitelist) ScareCrow creates these certificates by using a go package version of the tool limelighter to create a pfx12 file. This package takes an inputted domain name, specified by the user, to create a code signing certificate for that domain. If needed, you can also use your own code signing certificate if you have one, using the valid command-line option. Spoof the attributes of the loader: This is done by using syso files which are a form of embedded resource files that when compiled along with our loader, will modify the attribute portions of our compiled code. Prior to generating a syso file, ScareCrow will generate a random file name (based on the loader type) to use. Once chosen this file name will map to the associated attributes for that file name, ensuring that the right values are assigned. Changelog v1.5 Bug fixes Fixed error with delivery commands ‘htaandbits` that prevented the one-line command from displaying. Added in additional controls to allow certain types of loaders to be used with certain delivery commands (to prevent incompatibilities) Updated help menu & README to indicate which delivery commands work well with what loaders [hide][Hidden Content]]
  8. CrossC2 framework – Generator CobaltStrike’s cross-platform beacon CrossC2 framework is a security framework for enterprises and Red Team personnel supports CobaltStrike’s penetration testing of other platforms (Linux / MacOS / …), supports custom modules, and includes some commonly used penetration modules. Only for internal use by enterprises and organizations, this framework has a certain degree of instability. Non-professionals are not allowed to use it. Anyone shall not use it for illegal purposes and profitability. Besides that, publishing unauthorized modified version is also prohibited, or otherwise bear legal responsibilities. Feature For a faster way, see cna introduction GO Linux & MacOS supports no file landing, load and execute from memory dynamic library or executable file GO Flexibly customize the data return type of the execution file, portscan, screenshot, keystrokes, credentials and other user-defined development to achieve more convenient implementation GO Custom communication protocol GO Android & iPhone support GO Restricted description: CobaltStrike: currently only supports the last version of cs 3.14(bug fixes). Linux: For particularly old systems, you can choose the “Linux-GLIBC” option in cna (around 2010) MacOS: Latest systems only support 64-bit programs iOS: sandbox, restricted cmd Embedded: only *nix ⍻ : Loader is still in progress Changelog v2.1 New Supports running scripts from memory (bash/python/perl/ruby/php/..) [hide][Hidden Content]]
  9. Features Inject multiple payloads into all parameters Inject single payloads into all parameters Saves responses into output folder Displays Status Code & Response Length Can grep for patterns in the response Really fast Easy to setup [hide][Hidden Content]]
  10. Description A security framework for enterprises and Red Team personnel, supports CobaltStrike's penetration testing of other platforms (Linux / MacOS / ...), supports custom modules, and includes some commonly used penetration modules. ChangeLog release v2.0 : -fix Fix the problem of path errors caused by backslashes when uploading files in the file management office -fix Long-term testing in various scenarios in the real environment, fixing some hidden problems, and now more stable +support Support for lower kernel version systems +support Environment variables are automatically set at startup +support Delete sensitive env records at startup +support The background service process can be linked to the init process at startup +support Increase session spawn function +support Increase the function of session setting environment variables +support Increase the privilege escalation function of session getsystem +support Increase session analysis function to handle multiple merge tasks +support Increase Mac & Linux lateral movement function [hide][Hidden Content]]
  11. xeca is a project that creates encrypted PowerShell payloads for offensive purposes. Creating position independent shellcode from DLL files is also possible. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  12. Introduction Pixload is an advanced set of tools that allows you to hide payloads within image files by either creating or injecting the intended payload into the desired image. Pixload: Image Payload Creating & Injecting Tools This set of tools has the ability to give you an access to some sophisticated hacking functions. Through it, you can create Polyglot files that can be used to sidestep the standard CSP security procedures by injecting the necessary attack scripts into a given image file. Polyglot files can be very effective when exploiting browsers such as Firefox, IE11, Edge, and Safari. One of the advantages of this type of exploit is that it can allow you to deploy attack files in the form of JavaScript or image files. The payloads which have been deployed can also be easily extracted without applying any external script during an attack. With Pixload you can also be able to exploit server-side misconfigurations by scripting malicious codes into the available system files.Through GD file manipulation PHP shells can be restructured in the form of PNG and IDAT chunks. Features: Bypassing CSP using polyglot JPEGs Encoding Web Shells in PNG IDAT chunks Hidden malvertising attacks (with Polyglot images) XSS payload revisiting (in PNG and IDAT chunks) XSS Facebook upload (Wonky and PNG content) [hide][Hidden Content]]
  13. Introduction SNOWCRASH creates a script that can be launched on both Linux and Windows machines. Payload selected by the user (in this case combined Bash and Powershell code) is embedded into a single polyglot template, which is platform-agnostic. There are few payloads available, including command execution, reverse shell establishment, binary execution and some more :> [hide][Hidden Content]]
  14. A GUI for MSF Venom that serves the generated payload for you, in addition to launching a listener using the provided port. DESKTOP BUTTON OPTION For a full GUI experience you can add a desktop shortcut to your VM. You will need to add the following file --> taipan.desktop --> ~/.local/share/applications Make sure to edit the file with the path location where you downloaded the TaiPan_v1.0.py app. [hide][Hidden Content]]
  15. itsMe

    Metasploit Payload Generator

    GEN-GENERATOR metasploit payload generator [hide][Hidden Content]]
  16. Read the license before using any part from this code Malicious Android apk generator (Reverse Shell) [HIDE][Hidden Content]]
  17. Kaiten A Undetectable Payload Generation. This tool is for educational purpose only, usage of Kaiten for attacking targets without prior mutual consent is illegal. Developers assume no liability and are not responsible for any misuse or damage caused by this program. Requirements MingW (64 & 32) GCC OSSLSIGNCODE Features Undetectable Payload Generation Stealth FUD Payload Self Signing Certificate Random Junk code Affected Devices and Operating Systems Windows Android (soon) Mac/Linux [HIDE][Hidden Content]]
  18. Features: Fully Undetectable Win32 MSFVenom Payload (meterpreter/shell reverse tcp) Port Forwarding using ngrok Tested: Win7/Win10 Requirements: Metasploit/MSFVenom mingw-w64: apt-get install mingw-w64 [HIDE][Hidden Content]]
  19. RapidPayload Framework RapidPayload - Metasploit Payload Generator Requirements OpenJDK 8 (JAVA) , or superiors versions . Metasploit Apktool Python3 [HIDE][Hidden Content]]
  20. WhatsRCE This is a Automated Generate Payload for CVE-2019-11932 (WhatsApp Remote Code Execution) Auto install GCC (no harm command, you can see this is open-source) Saving to .GIF file How To Use ? [Hidden Content]
  21. 0x1

    OWASP ZSC

    OWASP ZSC Tool Project OWASP ZSC is an open source software in Python language which lets you generate customized shellcodes and convert scripts to an obfuscated script. This software can be run on Windows/Linux/OSX under Python. Watch the video to learn how generate shellcode with ZCR Shellcoder. [hide][Hidden Content]] Usage of shellcodes Shellcodes are small codes in Assembly language which could be used as the payload in software exploitation. Other usages are in malwares, bypassing antiviruses, obfuscated codes and etc. DISCLAIMER This tool is related to IT, Hacking, Programming and Computer|Network|Software Security. The word “Hack”, "Pen testing",“Hacking” that is used on these project pages shall be regarded as “Ethical Hack” or “Ethical Hacking” respectively. This is not a tool that provides any illegal information.We do not promote hacking or software cracking. All the information provided on these pages is for educational purposes only. The authors of this tool are not responsible for any misuse of the information.You shall not misuse the information to gain unauthorized access and/or write malicious programs.This information shall only be used to expand knowledge and not for causing malicious or damaging attacks.You may try all of these techniques on your own computer at your own risk.Performing any hack attempts/tests without written permission from the owner of the computer system is illegal. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE CREATORS, OWNER, OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. Usage of Obfuscate Codes Can be used for bypassing antiviruses, code protections, same stuff etc … Why use OWASP ZSC ? Another good reason for obfuscating files or generating shellcode with ZSC is that it can be used during your pen-testing. Malicious hackers use these techniques to bypass anti-virus and load malicious files in systems they have hacked using customized shellcode generators. Anti-virus work with signatures in order to identify harmful files. When using very well known encoders such as msfvenom, files generated by this program might be already flagged by Anti-virus programs. Our purpose is not to provide a way to bypass anti-virus with malicious intentions, instead, we want to provide pen-testers a way to challenge the security provided by Anti-virus programs and Intrusion Detection systems during a pen test.In this way, they can verify the security just as a black-hat will do. According to other shellcode generators same as Metasploit tools and etc, OWASP ZSC using new encodes and methods which antiviruses won't detect. OWASP ZSC encoders are able to generate shell codes with random encodes and that allows you to generate thousands of new dynamic shellcodes with the same job in just a second, that means, you will not get the same code if you use random encodes with same commands, And that make OWASP ZSC one of the best! During the Google Summer of Code we are working on to generate Windows Shellcode and new obfuscation methods. We are working on the next version that will allow you to generate OSX. Video ACSII of the OWASP ZSC tool in action! This video shows: Generating shellcode through the menu interface Generating shellcode from the command-line Using shellcode from the shell-storm web repository Obfuscating a python script Download && more info [hide][Hidden Content]]
  22. SQL Injection In this section, we'll explain what SQL injection is, describe some common examples, explain how to find and exploit various kinds of SQL injection vulnerabilities, and summarize how to prevent SQL injection. What is SQL injection (SQLi)? SQL injection is a web security vulnerability that allows an attacker to interfere with the queries that an application makes to its database. It generally allows an attacker to view data that they are not normally able to retrieve. This might include data belonging to other users, or any other data that the application itself is able to access. In many cases, an attacker can modify or delete this data, causing persistent changes to the application's content or behavior. In some situations, an attacker can escalate an SQL injection attack to compromise the underlying server or other back-end infrastructure, or perform a denial-of-service attack. [HIDE][Hidden Content]]
  23. 0x1

    ezXSS

    ezXSS ezXSS is an easy way for penetration testers and bug bounty hunters to test (blind) Cross Site Scripting. Current features Some features ezXSS has Easy to use dashboard with statics, payloads, view/share/search reports and more Payload generator Instant email alert on payload Custom javascript payload Enable/Disable screenshots Prevent double payloads from saving or alerting Block domains Share reports with a direct link or with other ezXSS users Easily manage and view reports in the dashboard Secure your login with extra protection (2FA) The following information is collected on a vulnerable page: The URL of the page IP Address Any page referer (or share referer) The User-Agent All Non-HTTP-Only Cookies All Locale Storage All Session Storage Full HTML DOM source of the page Page origin Time of execution Screenshot of the page its just ez Required A host with PHP 7.1 or up A domain name (consider a short one) An SSL if you want to test on https websites (consider Cloudflare or Let's Encrypt for a free SSL) Installation ezXSS is ez to install Clone the repository and put the files in the document root Create an empty database and provide your database information in 'src/Database.php' Visit /manage/install in your browser and setup a password and email Done! That was ez right? Demo [Hidden Content] Download [hide][Hidden Content]]
  24. This Metasploit module executes a Metasploit payload against the Equation Group's DOUBLEPULSAR implant for SMB as popularly deployed by ETERNALBLUE. While this module primarily performs code execution against the implant, the "Neutralize implant" target allows you to disable the implant. View the full article