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yoyohoneysinger

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  1. yoyohoneysinger

    recruting website hackers and skilled hackers

    ofcourse you can send me mail here MODERATED
  2. WPA2 is a 13-year-old WiFi authentication scheme widely used to secure WiFi connections, but the standard has been compromised, impacting almost all Wi-Fi devices—including in our homes and businesses, along with the networking companies that build them. Dubbed KRACK—Key Reinstallation Attack—the proof-of-concept attack demonstrated by a team of researchers works against all modern protected Wi-Fi networks and can be abused to steal sensitive information like credit card numbers, passwords, chat messages, emails, and photos. Since the weaknesses reside in the Wi-Fi standard itself, and not in the implementations or any individual product, any correct implementation of WPA2 is likely affected. According to the researchers, the newly discovered attack works against: Both WPA1 and WPA2, Personal and enterprise networks, Ciphers WPA-TKIP, AES-CCMP, and GCMP In short, if your device supports WiFi, it is most likely affected. During their initial research, the researchers discovered that Android, Linux, Apple, Windows, OpenBSD, MediaTek, Linksys, and others, are all affected by the KRACK attacks. It should be noted that the KRACK attack does not help attackers recover the targeted WiFi's password; instead, it allows them to decrypt WiFi users' data without cracking or knowing the actual password. So merely changing your Wi-Fi network password does not prevent (or mitigate) KRACK attack. Here's How the KRACK WPA2 Attack Works (PoC Code): Discovered by researcher Mathy Vanhoef of imec-DistriNet, KU Leuven, the KRACK attack works by exploiting a 4-way handshake of the WPA2 protocol that's used to establish a key for encrypting traffic. For a successful KRACK attack, an attacker needs to trick a victim into re-installing an already-in-use key, which is achieved by manipulating and replaying cryptographic handshake messages. The research [PDF], titled Key Reinstallation Attacks: Forcing Nonce Reuse in WPA2, has been published by Mathy Vanhoef of KU Leuven and Frank Piessens of imec-DistriNet, Nitesh Saxena and Maliheh Shirvanian of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Yong Li of Huawei Technologies, and Sven Schäge of Ruhr-Universität Bochum. The team has successfully executed the key reinstallation attack against an Android smartphone, showing how an attacker can decrypt all data that the victim transmits over a protected WiFi. You can watch the video demonstration above and download proof-of-concept (PoC) code from Github. The researchers say their key reinstallation attack could be exceptionally devastating against Linux and Android 6.0 or higher, because "Android and Linux can be tricked into (re)installing an all-zero encryption key (see below for more info)." However, there's no need to panic, as you aren't vulnerable to just anyone on the internet because a successful exploitation of KRACK attack requires an attacker to be within physical proximity to the intended WiFi network. WPA2 Vulnerabilities and their Brief Details The key management vulnerabilities in the WPA2 protocol discovered by the researchers has been tracked as: CVE-2017-13077: Reinstallation of the pairwise encryption key (PTK-TK) in the four-way handshake. CVE-2017-13078: Reinstallation of the group key (GTK) in the four-way handshake. CVE-2017-13079: Reinstallation of the integrity group key (IGTK) in the four-way handshake. CVE-2017-13080: Reinstallation of the group key (GTK) in the group key handshake. CVE-2017-13081: Reinstallation of the integrity group key (IGTK) in the group key handshake. CVE-2017-13082: Accepting a retransmitted Fast BSS Transition (FT) Reassociation Request and reinstalling the pairwise encryption key (PTK-TK) while processing it. CVE-2017-13084: Reinstallation of the STK key in the PeerKey handshake. CVE-2017-13086: reinstallation of the Tunneled Direct-Link Setup (TDLS) PeerKey (TPK) key in the TDLS handshake. CVE-2017-13087: reinstallation of the group key (GTK) while processing a Wireless Network Management (WNM) Sleep Mode Response frame. CVE-2017-13088: reinstallation of the integrity group key (IGTK) while processing a Wireless Network Management (WNM) Sleep Mode Response frame. The researchers discovered the vulnerabilities last year, but sent out notifications to several vendors on July 14, along with the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT), who sent out a broad warning to hundreds of vendors on 28 August 2017. In order to patch these vulnerabilities, you need to wait for the firmware updates from your device vendors. According to researchers, the communication over HTTPS is secure (but may not be 100 percent secure) and cannot be decrypted using the KRACK attack. So, you are advised to use a secure VPN service—which encrypts all your Internet traffic whether it’s HTTPS or HTTP. You can read more information about these vulnerabilities on the KRACK attack's dedicated website, and the research paper. The team has also released a script using which you can check whether if your WiFi network is vulnerable to the KRACK attack or not.
  3. Preety Well Embraced

  4. A Certified Ethical Hacker is a skilled professional who understands and knows how to look for weaknesses and vulnerabilities in target systems and uses the same knowledge and tools as a malicious hacker, but in a lawful and legitimate manner to assess the security posture of a target system(s). The CEH credential certifies individuals in the specific network security discipline of Ethical Hacking from a vendor-neutral perspective. This is the worlds most advanced certified ethical hacking course with 20 of the most current security domains any individual will ever want to know when they are planning to beef up the information security posture of their organization. In 20 comprehensive modules, the course covers 340 attack technologies, commonly used by hackers. What’s new in the CEH v10? (Certified Ethical Hacker Certification) EC-Council has announced the CEH v10 – the tenth edition of the popular Certified Ethical Hacker certification. Unveiled amongst other huge updates at the Scaling the unscalable mountain of cyber capability webinar, CEH v10 marks a new chapter for the certification as it aims to maintain its status as the world’s top ethical hacking certification. The CEH dates back to 2003 and has been updated regularly to embrace evolving technologies. As a reminder, the CEH certification was last updated in 2015, with the launch of the CEH v9. This update increased the number of modules to 18 and introduced a greater focus on cloud computing. Alongside other EC-Council partners, Firebrand attended the announcement webinar to give our students their first look at these important updates. What’s new in the CEH v10? EC-Council is continuing to update CEH to meet the demands of employers across the world. Here’s what’s new in the CEH v10: A module on the Internet of Things (IoT) security Upgraded vulnerability assessment material A focus on cloud attack vectors, AI and Machine Learning Introduction of the CEH Practical In response to the escalating threat of unsecured IoT devices – like 2017’s Mirai botnet attack - CEH v10 will introduce a new module focusing on Internet of Things (IoT) security. This module will provide professionals with the knowledge they need to test, deploy and manage the security of IoT devices. The new version of CEH will also introduce upgraded vulnerability assessment content. Vulnerability assessment is a critical element of the hacking life-cycle and v10 will increase the depth of application vulnerability analysis in real-world environments. Students will cover the tools required to assess systems, the tools hackers use and how to fix vulnerabilities. Professionals can expect an increased focus on emerging attacks vectors, like cloud technologies, AI and machine learning. Students will find themselves studying AI and Machine Learning to conduct vulnerability assessments in an effort to defend against malware attacks. The CEH v10 will also introduce students to the malware analysis process – the method for determining the functionality, origin and impact of malware through reverse engineering. The new CEH exam maintains the same format as its predecessors: Number of Questions: 125 Test Duration: 4 Hours Test Format: Multiple Choice Test Delivery: ECC EXAM, VUE Exam Prefix: 312-50 (ECC EXAM), 312-50 (VUE) Lab Tools for CEH v10: CEHv10 – Lab Prerequisites CEHv10 Module – Footprinting and Reconnaissance CEHv10 Module – Scanning Networks CEHv10 Module – Enumeration CEHv10 Module – Vulnerability Analysis CEHv10 Module – System Hacking CEHv10 Module – Malware Threats CEHv10 Module – Sniffing CEHv10 Module – Social Engineering CEHv10 Module – Denial-of-Service CEHv10 Module – Session Hijacking CEHv10 Module – Evading IDS, Firewalls, and Honeypots CEHv10 Module – Hacking Web Servers CEHv10 Module – Hacking Web Applications CEHv10 Module – SQL Injection CEHv10 Module – Hacking Wireless Networks CEHv10 Module – Hacking Mobile Platforms CEHv10 Module – Cloud Computing CEHv10 Module – Cryptography ------ MAGNET LINK ----- magnet:?xt=urn:btih:E9D4B579D19A9877FC89B18B4AE9FFC1D100801B&dn=%5BFreeCoursesOnline.Me%5D%20CEH%20v10%20Certified%20Ethical%20Hacker%20Lab%20Tools%20-%20%5BFCO%5D.torrent&tr=[Hidden Content] Go To: Copy/paste Whole code to your browser’s address and press Enter, to start download via torrent client. Size: 4.79 GB (5,152,705,971 bytes)
  5. yoyohoneysinger

    Mobile Phone Call and Towers Tracking java

    Guide :- [Hidden Content] Github :- [Hidden Content]
  6. yoyohoneysinger

    [BOTNET] Megalodon HTTP Botnet

    @m3tal i m newbiee in forum dont mind ... i will check everything from now
  7. yoyohoneysinger

    500 GB Programming Courses GDRIVE

    [Hidden Content]
  8. yoyohoneysinger

    [BOTNET] Megalodon HTTP Botnet

    Download Link [Hidden Content]
  9. yoyohoneysinger

    Ransomware Petya

    [Hidden Content] DANGER USE IN VM OR RDP DONT USE IN YOUR COMPUTER DOWLOAD LINK PROBLEM FEEL FREE TO REPLY For more information
  10. yoyohoneysinger

    Spytector_keylogger

    INFECTED Very good to capture keystrokes Main Settings Basic Email FTP Module Settings Logs Settings Logs Viewer I am a ratter, binner and cybersecurity analysist . You can follow me on twitter and this site. I will publish tools, proxies, bins and other tools here. My twitter id : [Hidden Content] Disable antivirus or it will block it from running [Hidden Content] INFECTED
  11. yoyohoneysinger

    400x Udemy Accounts

    Guys today I am giving you 400 or more udemy accounts. Most of them are working. [Hidden Content]
  12. yoyohoneysinger

    Atmos Botnet v1.01

    brother post botnets latest
  13. yoyohoneysinger

    uBot Source Code + Cpanel

    @dEEpEst You are great ... Bro I need to become a man like you. I need your help...
  14. yoyohoneysinger

    Black Hat Hacking Course

    Download here [Hidden Content]
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